Programmes

Under 6

 

Children’s characteristics

  • Fragile, developing quickly, difficulties with coordination
  • Short attention and concentration spans
  • Excellent facility for imitation (visual memory)
  • Likes playing, plays for him/herself, egocentrism
  • Enjoyment of the game

 

Just a child

Training content

  • Basic football technique, coordination exercises
  • Introductory games, getting used to the ball
  • Small-sided games: 4 v 4 and 5 v 5 matches
  • Alternating matches, introductory games and exercises
  • Balanced groups or teams

 

Playing, enjoying

The coach-educator’s role

  • Supervises games, reassures and motivates
  • Demonstrates the exercises
  • Simple, expressive language
  • Limited intervention / letting the children play
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

Having fun through football

Under 8

Children’s characteristics

  • Fragile, developing quickly, difficulties with coordination
  • Short attention and concentration spans
  • Excellent facility for imitation (visual memory)
  • Likes playing, plays for him/herself, egocentrism
  • Enjoyment of the game

 

Just a child

Training content

  • Basic football technique, coordination exercises
  • Introductory games, getting used to the ball
  • Small-sided games: 4 v 4 and 5 v 5 matches
  • Alternating matches, introductory games and exercises
  • Balanced groups or teams

 

Playing, enjoying

The coach-educator’s role

  • Supervises games, reassures and motivates
  • Demonstrates the exercises
  • Simple, expressive language
  • Limited intervention / letting the children play
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

Having fun through football

Under 6

 

Children’s characteristics

  • Fragile, developing quickly, difficulties with coordination
  • Short attention and concentration spans
  • Excellent facility for imitation (visual memory)
  • Likes playing, plays for him/herself, egocentrism
  • Enjoyment of the game

 

Just a child

Training content

  • Basic football technique, coordination exercises
  • Introductory games, getting used to the ball
  • Small-sided games: 4 v 4 and 5 v 5 matches
  • Alternating matches, introductory games and exercises
  • Balanced groups or teams

 

Playing, enjoying

The coach-educator’s role

  • Supervises games, reassures and motivates
  • Demonstrates the exercises
  • Simple, expressive language
  • Limited intervention / letting the children play
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

Having fun through football

Under 8

Children’s characteristics

  • Fragile, developing quickly, difficulties with coordination
  • Short attention and concentration spans
  • Excellent facility for imitation (visual memory)
  • Likes playing, plays for him/herself, egocentrism
  • Enjoyment of the game

 

Just a child

Training content

  • Basic football technique, coordination exercises
  • Introductory games, getting used to the ball
  • Small-sided games: 4 v 4 and 5 v 5 matches
  • Alternating matches, introductory games and exercises
  • Balanced groups or teams

 

Playing, enjoying

The coach-educator’s role

  • Supervises games, reassures and motivates
  • Demonstrates the exercises
  • Simple, expressive language
  • Limited intervention / letting the children play
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

Having fun through football

Unders 10

 

Children’s characteristics

  • Improved speed, endurance and strength
  • Improved coordination
  • Good visual memory
  • Good self-confidence
  • Discussion skills
  • A hunger to learn and discover
  • Collective spirit

 

A child in a team of friends

Training content

  • Basic techniques (the basics of football)
  • Basic team organisation
  • Speed, energy, reaction, coordination
  • Training games
  • Small-sided games: 5 v 5, 7 v 7 (depending on the level of the children)
  • Alternating matches, training games, exercises
  • Balanced groups or teams

Playing, discovering, experimenting

The Coach-educator’s role

  • Methodology, teaching techniques
  • Emotional and technical leadership
  • Organisational and communication skills
  • Establishing team spirit
  • General knowledge of football
  • Demonstration, implementation, correction
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

Learning by playing

Under 12

 

Children’s characteristics

  • Significant physical changes
  • Better balance, better coordination
  • Improved visual and aural memory
  • Critical faculties, discussion skills
  • Improved attention
  • A hunger to learn
  • Assertiveness
  • Development of the competitive spirit
  • Team spirit

 

A player in the team

Training content

  • Speed, energy and reaction
  • Coordination
  • Basic techniques (the basics of football)
  • Basic team organisation (3-2-3)
  • The general principles of play and motivation
  • Control of space and movement
  • Small-sided games: 5 v 5, 7 v 7, 9 v 9 (depending on the level of the children)
  • Promoting creativity
  • Encouraging individuals to take initiative


Playing and taking part

The coach-educator’s role

  • Methodology and teaching techniques
  • Establishing a group spirit
  • Quality of behaviour
  • Knowledge of football
  • Technical language
  • Teaching through play
  • Motivating the team
  • Demonstration, implementation, correction
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

A footballer in a team

Children development theory

 

Children grow at different speeds, depending on the different stages of development they are going through. Sexual characteristics generally start to develop at 11.5 years of age for girls and 12.5 for boys. The first signs are the development of breasts in girls and enlargement of the testicles in boys.

Annual growth in height increases from 5cm before puberty to 7-9cm during the pubertal growth spurt. On average, this growth spurt is experienced by girls at the age of 12 and by boys at 14. However, differences in growth before the age of 12 should not prevent boys and girls from playing together.

Coach-educators should nevertheless take account of the difference between their chronological ages and their biological ages as well as any cases of precocious puberty when managing mixed groups to ensure they are well balanced.

 

1. Preparing the session

  • Written notes
  • General knowledge of football
  • Setting the objectives to be achieved
  • Choice of exercises, adapted to the children’s capabilities
  • Preparation in terms of the location and schedule of exercises
  • Tailoring instructions depending on the children’s level
  • Gradual development of exercises, taking the children’s level into account
  • Repetition of exercises and memorising of situations by the children
  • Evaluation of exercises and progress made by the children

2. Organising the session

  • Setting out the area for play, providing a suitable space
  • Teaching equipment, first-aid kit
  • Organisation of exercises and games: distribution of bibs, movement and rotation of players, etc.
  • Organisation of teams. It is important that teams are balanced when they compete against each other to make sure that the children remain motivated
  • Players’ level
  • Players’ physical characteristics
  • Diversity, adapting the rules if necessary
  • Progressive development of exercises and games
  • Duration and repetition of exercises
  • Rest periods, drinks for the children

3. Motivating the session

  • Simple, comprehensive explanations of the objectives of the session
  • Presentation of the contents
  • Organisation of teams and/or working groups in workshops
  • Setting up exercises
  • Positioning players
  • Demonstrating the exercise
  • Carrying out the exercise, monitoring time taken
  • Exercises and motivation
  • Teaching by encouragement
  • Monitoring comprehension of exercises and the quality of implementation
  • Collective and/or individual correction of exercises
  • Ongoing control of schedule and area
  • Pursuit of technical quality
  • Games and motivation
  • Teaching by encouragement
  • Allowing play to continue, infrequent intervention
  • Encouraging individual initiative
  • Promoting creativity
  • Ongoing control of schedule and area
  • Maintaining the technical balance between teams

4. Concluding the session

  • Bringing the children back together and calming down
  • Evaluation, discussion, recommendations
  • Introduction of the next session
  • Putting equipment away
  • Overseeing the children’s departure

Under 6

 

Children’s characteristics

  • Fragile, developing quickly, difficulties with coordination
  • Short attention and concentration spans
  • Excellent facility for imitation (visual memory)
  • Likes playing, plays for him/herself, egocentrism
  • Enjoyment of the game

 

Just a child

Training content

  • Basic football technique, coordination exercises
  • Introductory games, getting used to the ball
  • Small-sided games: 4 v 4 and 5 v 5 matches
  • Alternating matches, introductory games and exercises
  • Balanced groups or teams

 

Playing, enjoying

The coach-educator’s role

  • Supervises games, reassures and motivates
  • Demonstrates the exercises
  • Simple, expressive language
  • Limited intervention / letting the children play
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

Having fun through football

Under 8

Children’s characteristics

  • Fragile, developing quickly, difficulties with coordination
  • Short attention and concentration spans
  • Excellent facility for imitation (visual memory)
  • Likes playing, plays for him/herself, egocentrism
  • Enjoyment of the game

 

Just a child

Training content

  • Basic football technique, coordination exercises
  • Introductory games, getting used to the ball
  • Small-sided games: 4 v 4 and 5 v 5 matches
  • Alternating matches, introductory games and exercises
  • Balanced groups or teams

 

Playing, enjoying

The coach-educator’s role

  • Supervises games, reassures and motivates
  • Demonstrates the exercises
  • Simple, expressive language
  • Limited intervention / letting the children play
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

Having fun through football

Unders 10

 

Children’s characteristics

  • Improved speed, endurance and strength
  • Improved coordination
  • Good visual memory
  • Good self-confidence
  • Discussion skills
  • A hunger to learn and discover
  • Collective spirit

 

A child in a team of friends

Training content

  • Basic techniques (the basics of football)
  • Basic team organisation
  • Speed, energy, reaction, coordination
  • Training games
  • Small-sided games: 5 v 5, 7 v 7 (depending on the level of the children)
  • Alternating matches, training games, exercises
  • Balanced groups or teams

Playing, discovering, experimenting

The Coach-educator’s role

  • Methodology, teaching techniques
  • Emotional and technical leadership
  • Organisational and communication skills
  • Establishing team spirit
  • General knowledge of football
  • Demonstration, implementation, correction
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

Learning by playing

Under 12

 

Children’s characteristics

  • Significant physical changes
  • Better balance, better coordination
  • Improved visual and aural memory
  • Critical faculties, discussion skills
  • Improved attention
  • A hunger to learn
  • Assertiveness
  • Development of the competitive spirit
  • Team spirit

 

A player in the team

Training content

  • Speed, energy and reaction
  • Coordination
  • Basic techniques (the basics of football)
  • Basic team organisation (3-2-3)
  • The general principles of play and motivation
  • Control of space and movement
  • Small-sided games: 5 v 5, 7 v 7, 9 v 9 (depending on the level of the children)
  • Promoting creativity
  • Encouraging individuals to take initiative


Playing and taking part

The coach-educator’s role

  • Methodology and teaching techniques
  • Establishing a group spirit
  • Quality of behaviour
  • Knowledge of football
  • Technical language
  • Teaching through play
  • Motivating the team
  • Demonstration, implementation, correction
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

A footballer in a team

Children development theory

 

Children grow at different speeds, depending on the different stages of development they are going through. Sexual characteristics generally start to develop at 11.5 years of age for girls and 12.5 for boys. The first signs are the development of breasts in girls and enlargement of the testicles in boys.

Annual growth in height increases from 5cm before puberty to 7-9cm during the pubertal growth spurt. On average, this growth spurt is experienced by girls at the age of 12 and by boys at 14. However, differences in growth before the age of 12 should not prevent boys and girls from playing together.

Coach-educators should nevertheless take account of the difference between their chronological ages and their biological ages as well as any cases of precocious puberty when managing mixed groups to ensure they are well balanced.

 

1. Preparing the session

  • Written notes
  • General knowledge of football
  • Setting the objectives to be achieved
  • Choice of exercises, adapted to the children’s capabilities
  • Preparation in terms of the location and schedule of exercises
  • Tailoring instructions depending on the children’s level
  • Gradual development of exercises, taking the children’s level into account
  • Repetition of exercises and memorising of situations by the children
  • Evaluation of exercises and progress made by the children

2. Organising the session

  • Setting out the area for play, providing a suitable space
  • Teaching equipment, first-aid kit
  • Organisation of exercises and games: distribution of bibs, movement and rotation of players, etc.
  • Organisation of teams. It is important that teams are balanced when they compete against each other to make sure that the children remain motivated
  • Players’ level
  • Players’ physical characteristics
  • Diversity, adapting the rules if necessary
  • Progressive development of exercises and games
  • Duration and repetition of exercises
  • Rest periods, drinks for the children

3. Motivating the session

  • Simple, comprehensive explanations of the objectives of the session
  • Presentation of the contents
  • Organisation of teams and/or working groups in workshops
  • Setting up exercises
  • Positioning players
  • Demonstrating the exercise
  • Carrying out the exercise, monitoring time taken
  • Exercises and motivation
  • Teaching by encouragement
  • Monitoring comprehension of exercises and the quality of implementation
  • Collective and/or individual correction of exercises
  • Ongoing control of schedule and area
  • Pursuit of technical quality
  • Games and motivation
  • Teaching by encouragement
  • Allowing play to continue, infrequent intervention
  • Encouraging individual initiative
  • Promoting creativity
  • Ongoing control of schedule and area
  • Maintaining the technical balance between teams

4. Concluding the session

  • Bringing the children back together and calming down
  • Evaluation, discussion, recommendations
  • Introduction of the next session
  • Putting equipment away
  • Overseeing the children’s departure

Under 6

 

Children’s characteristics

  • Fragile, developing quickly, difficulties with coordination
  • Short attention and concentration spans
  • Excellent facility for imitation (visual memory)
  • Likes playing, plays for him/herself, egocentrism
  • Enjoyment of the game

 

Just a child

Training content

  • Basic football technique, coordination exercises
  • Introductory games, getting used to the ball
  • Small-sided games: 4 v 4 and 5 v 5 matches
  • Alternating matches, introductory games and exercises
  • Balanced groups or teams

 

Playing, enjoying

The coach-educator’s role

  • Supervises games, reassures and motivates
  • Demonstrates the exercises
  • Simple, expressive language
  • Limited intervention / letting the children play
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

Having fun through football

Under 8

Children’s characteristics

  • Fragile, developing quickly, difficulties with coordination
  • Short attention and concentration spans
  • Excellent facility for imitation (visual memory)
  • Likes playing, plays for him/herself, egocentrism
  • Enjoyment of the game

 

Just a child

Training content

  • Basic football technique, coordination exercises
  • Introductory games, getting used to the ball
  • Small-sided games: 4 v 4 and 5 v 5 matches
  • Alternating matches, introductory games and exercises
  • Balanced groups or teams

 

Playing, enjoying

The coach-educator’s role

  • Supervises games, reassures and motivates
  • Demonstrates the exercises
  • Simple, expressive language
  • Limited intervention / letting the children play
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

Having fun through football

Unders 10

 

Children’s characteristics

  • Improved speed, endurance and strength
  • Improved coordination
  • Good visual memory
  • Good self-confidence
  • Discussion skills
  • A hunger to learn and discover
  • Collective spirit

 

A child in a team of friends

Training content

  • Basic techniques (the basics of football)
  • Basic team organisation
  • Speed, energy, reaction, coordination
  • Training games
  • Small-sided games: 5 v 5, 7 v 7 (depending on the level of the children)
  • Alternating matches, training games, exercises
  • Balanced groups or teams

Playing, discovering, experimenting

The Coach-educator’s role

  • Methodology, teaching techniques
  • Emotional and technical leadership
  • Organisational and communication skills
  • Establishing team spirit
  • General knowledge of football
  • Demonstration, implementation, correction
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

Learning by playing

Under 12

 

Children’s characteristics

  • Significant physical changes
  • Better balance, better coordination
  • Improved visual and aural memory
  • Critical faculties, discussion skills
  • Improved attention
  • A hunger to learn
  • Assertiveness
  • Development of the competitive spirit
  • Team spirit

 

A player in the team

Training content

  • Speed, energy and reaction
  • Coordination
  • Basic techniques (the basics of football)
  • Basic team organisation (3-2-3)
  • The general principles of play and motivation
  • Control of space and movement
  • Small-sided games: 5 v 5, 7 v 7, 9 v 9 (depending on the level of the children)
  • Promoting creativity
  • Encouraging individuals to take initiative


Playing and taking part

The coach-educator’s role

  • Methodology and teaching techniques
  • Establishing a group spirit
  • Quality of behaviour
  • Knowledge of football
  • Technical language
  • Teaching through play
  • Motivating the team
  • Demonstration, implementation, correction
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

A footballer in a team

Children development theory

 

Children grow at different speeds, depending on the different stages of development they are going through. Sexual characteristics generally start to develop at 11.5 years of age for girls and 12.5 for boys. The first signs are the development of breasts in girls and enlargement of the testicles in boys.

Annual growth in height increases from 5cm before puberty to 7-9cm during the pubertal growth spurt. On average, this growth spurt is experienced by girls at the age of 12 and by boys at 14. However, differences in growth before the age of 12 should not prevent boys and girls from playing together.

Coach-educators should nevertheless take account of the difference between their chronological ages and their biological ages as well as any cases of precocious puberty when managing mixed groups to ensure they are well balanced.

 

1. Preparing the session

  • Written notes
  • General knowledge of football
  • Setting the objectives to be achieved
  • Choice of exercises, adapted to the children’s capabilities
  • Preparation in terms of the location and schedule of exercises
  • Tailoring instructions depending on the children’s level
  • Gradual development of exercises, taking the children’s level into account
  • Repetition of exercises and memorising of situations by the children
  • Evaluation of exercises and progress made by the children

2. Organising the session

  • Setting out the area for play, providing a suitable space
  • Teaching equipment, first-aid kit
  • Organisation of exercises and games: distribution of bibs, movement and rotation of players, etc.
  • Organisation of teams. It is important that teams are balanced when they compete against each other to make sure that the children remain motivated
  • Players’ level
  • Players’ physical characteristics
  • Diversity, adapting the rules if necessary
  • Progressive development of exercises and games
  • Duration and repetition of exercises
  • Rest periods, drinks for the children

3. Motivating the session

  • Simple, comprehensive explanations of the objectives of the session
  • Presentation of the contents
  • Organisation of teams and/or working groups in workshops
  • Setting up exercises
  • Positioning players
  • Demonstrating the exercise
  • Carrying out the exercise, monitoring time taken
  • Exercises and motivation
  • Teaching by encouragement
  • Monitoring comprehension of exercises and the quality of implementation
  • Collective and/or individual correction of exercises
  • Ongoing control of schedule and area
  • Pursuit of technical quality
  • Games and motivation
  • Teaching by encouragement
  • Allowing play to continue, infrequent intervention
  • Encouraging individual initiative
  • Promoting creativity
  • Ongoing control of schedule and area
  • Maintaining the technical balance between teams

4. Concluding the session

  • Bringing the children back together and calming down
  • Evaluation, discussion, recommendations
  • Introduction of the next session
  • Putting equipment away
  • Overseeing the children’s departure

Under 6

 

Children’s characteristics

  • Fragile, developing quickly, difficulties with coordination
  • Short attention and concentration spans
  • Excellent facility for imitation (visual memory)
  • Likes playing, plays for him/herself, egocentrism
  • Enjoyment of the game

 

Just a child

Training content

  • Basic football technique, coordination exercises
  • Introductory games, getting used to the ball
  • Small-sided games: 4 v 4 and 5 v 5 matches
  • Alternating matches, introductory games and exercises
  • Balanced groups or teams

 

Playing, enjoying

The coach-educator’s role

  • Supervises games, reassures and motivates
  • Demonstrates the exercises
  • Simple, expressive language
  • Limited intervention / letting the children play
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

Having fun through football

Under 8

Children’s characteristics

  • Fragile, developing quickly, difficulties with coordination
  • Short attention and concentration spans
  • Excellent facility for imitation (visual memory)
  • Likes playing, plays for him/herself, egocentrism
  • Enjoyment of the game

 

Just a child

Training content

  • Basic football technique, coordination exercises
  • Introductory games, getting used to the ball
  • Small-sided games: 4 v 4 and 5 v 5 matches
  • Alternating matches, introductory games and exercises
  • Balanced groups or teams

 

Playing, enjoying

The coach-educator’s role

  • Supervises games, reassures and motivates
  • Demonstrates the exercises
  • Simple, expressive language
  • Limited intervention / letting the children play
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

Having fun through football

Unders 10

 

Children’s characteristics

  • Improved speed, endurance and strength
  • Improved coordination
  • Good visual memory
  • Good self-confidence
  • Discussion skills
  • A hunger to learn and discover
  • Collective spirit

 

A child in a team of friends

Training content

  • Basic techniques (the basics of football)
  • Basic team organisation
  • Speed, energy, reaction, coordination
  • Training games
  • Small-sided games: 5 v 5, 7 v 7 (depending on the level of the children)
  • Alternating matches, training games, exercises
  • Balanced groups or teams

Playing, discovering, experimenting

The Coach-educator’s role

  • Methodology, teaching techniques
  • Emotional and technical leadership
  • Organisational and communication skills
  • Establishing team spirit
  • General knowledge of football
  • Demonstration, implementation, correction
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

Learning by playing

Under 12

 

Children’s characteristics

  • Significant physical changes
  • Better balance, better coordination
  • Improved visual and aural memory
  • Critical faculties, discussion skills
  • Improved attention
  • A hunger to learn
  • Assertiveness
  • Development of the competitive spirit
  • Team spirit

 

A player in the team

Training content

  • Speed, energy and reaction
  • Coordination
  • Basic techniques (the basics of football)
  • Basic team organisation (3-2-3)
  • The general principles of play and motivation
  • Control of space and movement
  • Small-sided games: 5 v 5, 7 v 7, 9 v 9 (depending on the level of the children)
  • Promoting creativity
  • Encouraging individuals to take initiative


Playing and taking part

The coach-educator’s role

  • Methodology and teaching techniques
  • Establishing a group spirit
  • Quality of behaviour
  • Knowledge of football
  • Technical language
  • Teaching through play
  • Motivating the team
  • Demonstration, implementation, correction
  • Teaching by encouragement

 

A footballer in a team

Children development theory

 

Children grow at different speeds, depending on the different stages of development they are going through. Sexual characteristics generally start to develop at 11.5 years of age for girls and 12.5 for boys. The first signs are the development of breasts in girls and enlargement of the testicles in boys.

Annual growth in height increases from 5cm before puberty to 7-9cm during the pubertal growth spurt. On average, this growth spurt is experienced by girls at the age of 12 and by boys at 14. However, differences in growth before the age of 12 should not prevent boys and girls from playing together.

Coach-educators should nevertheless take account of the difference between their chronological ages and their biological ages as well as any cases of precocious puberty when managing mixed groups to ensure they are well balanced.

 

1. Preparing the session

  • Written notes
  • General knowledge of football
  • Setting the objectives to be achieved
  • Choice of exercises, adapted to the children’s capabilities
  • Preparation in terms of the location and schedule of exercises
  • Tailoring instructions depending on the children’s level
  • Gradual development of exercises, taking the children’s level into account
  • Repetition of exercises and memorising of situations by the children
  • Evaluation of exercises and progress made by the children

2. Organising the session

  • Setting out the area for play, providing a suitable space
  • Teaching equipment, first-aid kit
  • Organisation of exercises and games: distribution of bibs, movement and rotation of players, etc.
  • Organisation of teams. It is important that teams are balanced when they compete against each other to make sure that the children remain motivated
  • Players’ level
  • Players’ physical characteristics
  • Diversity, adapting the rules if necessary
  • Progressive development of exercises and games
  • Duration and repetition of exercises
  • Rest periods, drinks for the children

3. Motivating the session

  • Simple, comprehensive explanations of the objectives of the session
  • Presentation of the contents
  • Organisation of teams and/or working groups in workshops
  • Setting up exercises
  • Positioning players
  • Demonstrating the exercise
  • Carrying out the exercise, monitoring time taken
  • Exercises and motivation
  • Teaching by encouragement
  • Monitoring comprehension of exercises and the quality of implementation
  • Collective and/or individual correction of exercises
  • Ongoing control of schedule and area
  • Pursuit of technical quality
  • Games and motivation
  • Teaching by encouragement
  • Allowing play to continue, infrequent intervention
  • Encouraging individual initiative
  • Promoting creativity
  • Ongoing control of schedule and area
  • Maintaining the technical balance between teams

4. Concluding the session

  • Bringing the children back together and calming down
  • Evaluation, discussion, recommendations
  • Introduction of the next session
  • Putting equipment away
  • Overseeing the children’s departure